If you are maintaining either a Community Repository or a full blown one (inside a chroot, etc), please go ahead reading this post, important changes are going to happen very soon.

As the average FLOSS developer does, one morning a few months ago I woke up and decided that I needed to break stuff. Three months later, it turned out I fully achieved this goal, for your great joy.

Eit is going to ease your life as Entropy repository maintainer (and packages cook!) in a very dramatic way. Largely inspired to the “Git-way of doing things” and to its awesomeness, it represents a complete rewrite of the “Community Repositories/Entropy Server” functionalities exposes by “equo community”, “reagent” and “activator”.

It will be available starting from Entropy 1.0_rc60 and will completely replace the old tools and their syntax carrying out a lot of minor improvements as well.
Please note that Community Repositories maintainers, shall need to set “community-mode = enable” inside /etc/entropy/server.conf (see server.conf.example for more info) in order to make Entropy Server behave correctly.

How the syntax changed actually? Just a few examples below.

eit status [<repository>], shows repository status, unstaged packages, packages ready to push, etc.
eit commit [<repository>], commits unstaged packages to given repository (or the current one).
eit checkout <repository>, switches to the given Entropy repository.
eit add [–to <repository>] <package> [<package> …], add the given unstaged packages to repository (current repository if none given).
eit push [<repository>] push staged changes to the remote repository.

This is just a subset of all the commands available, but they’re enough to start using Eit. “Top-level commands” are implemented as plugins to allow maximum modularity and 3rd-party extensions. Just subclass eit.commands.command.EitCommand and implement the respective methods.

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